Air & Wellness

There are many components that create a healthy, comfortable and productive indoor environment. Air quality is one of the most important yet least understood elements of the indoor environment.

Breathing clean air is good for the health of mind and body. The trickiest thing about air is that it usually takes longer to develop issues compared to drinking dirty water or eating bad food. Since the average person breathes 15,000 liters of air each day [1], the health benefit of breathing clean air is tremendous. Many common indoor pollutants are invisible and odourless, so it’s often difficult to realise when we’re exposing ourselves to unnecessary health risks. If we don’t know that a problem exists, we’re powerless to solve it.

Clean air solution for every space.

BSL partners with the industry leader Awair to provide enterprise-grade sensors that track temperature, humidity, CO2, VOCs, PM2.5, Lux, and Db. The Awair software dashboard and app can provide air data as well as actionable insights so you can take control of the air in your environment no matter where you are. Awair is already used by leading global organisations to optimise their facilities for tenant health and productivity.

Air3@2x

Clean air solution for every space.

BSL partners with the industry leader Awair to provide enterprise-grade sensors that track temperature, humidity, CO2, VOCs, PM2.5, Lux, and Db. The Awair software dashboard and app can provide air data as well as actionable insights so you can take control of the air in your environment no matter where you are. Awair is already used by leading global organisations to optimise their facilities for tenant health and productivity.

The Air Pollutants

PM2.5, or specifically known as Fine Dust, is particulate matter that can be found in the air that is incredibly small, with a diameter of less than 2.5 micrometres. Fine Dust is practically invisible, it can only be detected with an electron microscope. Because of its small size, PM2.5 are able to bypass the nose and throat and be absorbed by our lungs and bloodstream, leading to a variety of health effects. Exposure to PM2.5 can have detrimental health effects, and has been known to lead to coughing, chest tightness, shortness of breath, irritation of the eyes / nose / throat, and can trigger asthma, bronchitis, and other respiratory problems. Scientific studies have also linked exposure to an increased risk for heart attack, stroke, certain cancers, and birth defects. A recent Harvard University study has concluded that a small increase in long-term exposure to PM2.5 leads to a large increase in the COVID-19 death rate. [2]

Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are a large group of chemicals that are released or “off-gas” into the indoor air we breathe. Some common sources of VOCs are paint, adhesives, carpet, furniture, disinfectants and gasoline. Breathing VOCs can irritate the eyes, nose and throat, can cause difficulty breathing and nausea, and can damage the central nervous system as well as other organs. Some VOCs can cause cancer. Not all VOCs have all these health effects, though many have several. [3]

When lots of people are crowded into a small space, the CO2 being produced and exhaled into the air by those individuals becomes more concentrated. When CO2 is inhaled in high concentrations, it impedes our brain’s ability to metabolise oxygen [4]. A group of Harvard researchers discovered that as CO2 spikes, people’s decision making and processing of information suffers [5]. The research shows that individuals perform 300% better in a good air quality office compared to High CO2 office.

The Air Pollutants

PM2.5, or specifically known as Fine Dust, is particulate matter that can be found in the air that is incredibly small, with a diameter of less than 2.5 micrometres. Fine Dust is practically invisible, it can only be detected with an electron microscope. Because of its small size, PM2.5 are able to bypass the nose and throat and be absorbed by our lungs and bloodstream, leading to a variety of health effects. Exposure to PM2.5 can have detrimental health effects, and has been known to lead to coughing, chest tightness, shortness of breath, irritation of the eyes / nose / throat, and can trigger asthma, bronchitis, and other respiratory problems. Scientific studies have also linked exposure to an increased risk for heart attack, stroke, certain cancers, and birth defects. A recent Harvard University study has concluded that a small increase in long-term exposure to PM2.5 leads to a large increase in the COVID-19 death rate. [2]

Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) are a large group of chemicals that are released or “off-gas” into the indoor air we breathe. Some common sources of VOCs are paint, adhesives, carpet, furniture, disinfectants and gasoline. Breathing VOCs can irritate the eyes, nose and throat, can cause difficulty breathing and nausea, and can damage the central nervous system as well as other organs. Some VOCs can cause cancer. Not all VOCs have all these health effects, though many have several. [3]

When lots of people are crowded into a small space, the CO2 being produced and exhaled into the air by those individuals becomes more concentrated. When CO2 is inhaled in high concentrations, it impedes our brain’s ability to metabolise oxygen [4]. A group of Harvard researchers discovered that as CO2 spikes, people’s decision making and processing of information suffers [5]. The research shows that individuals perform 300% better in a good air quality office compared to High CO2 office.

Smart, High Tech and Easy To Use

We offer non-intrusive, affordable and customisable solutions to monitor and improve air quality and wellness. The easy-to-read dashboard and mobile app provides real time information for assessment, and can let you know the moment your air quality becomes unhealthy. Contact us to learn more.

Air5@2x